• Follow CCPHP on Twitter
  • Visit CCPHP on Facebook
  • Subscribe to CCPHP\'s YouTube Channel
  • Subscribe to CCPHP on Vimeo

Since June is Men’s Health Month, we’d like to focus on helping you maintain your prostate health.

The prostate, the gland that surrounds the urethra, begins to grow once men reach middle age and can become enlarged in many men over 40, leading to diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis, and prostate cancer.

  • Over 50% of men in their 60s and as many as 90% in their 70s or older have symptoms of an enlarged prostate or BPH.
  • Each year approximately 220,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and about 30,000 will die of it.
  • Prostatitis is an issue for men of all ages and is the most common prostate problem for men under age 50.[1]

So, while most of you already know to get annual screenings by your physician, these statistics also underscore the importance of maintaining your overall well-being by eating healthfully and exercising regularly. While there are relatively few studies linking exercise with a decrease in prostate cancer, the available studies do show that exercise is beneficial in maintaining overall prostate health.[2]

Based on questionnaires completed by more than 30,000 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, researchers found an inverse relationship between physical activity and BPH symptoms. Simply put, men who were more physically active were less likely to suffer from BPH. Even low- to moderate-intensity physical activity, such as walking regularly at a moderate pace, yielded benefits.[3]

These studies also concluded that men who exercise regularly also suffer less from erectile dysfunction (ED) and prostatitis. In addition, these men also felt better overall, with a decrease in depression and anxiety.

It doesn’t take much to improve your lifestyle for better health. The best news may be that mounting evidence is showing that some simple diet and lifestyle habits may make a difference when it comes to your prostate health. In addition to getting regular exercise three times a week, limiting red meat intake — and instead choosing lean proteins such as fish or chicken, avoiding overly salty foods,  increasing your consumption of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and cutting back on sugar, will  help not only your prostate, but your heart, body and mind, as well!

[1] Prostate Health Guide. Retrieved from http://www.prostatehealthguide.com/.

[2] Healthbeat. (Archived).10 diet & exercise tips for prostate health. Harvard.edu. Retrieved from https://www.health.harvard.edu/mens-health/10-diet-and-exercise-tips-for-prostate-health.

[3] Ibid.

Font Resize